More Apple Television Rumors And Speculations

Apple iTV mockup

Following up on yesterday’s rumor about Apple’s television, DigiTimes adds on information as to who they think will win the contract from Apple to build their television sets. In addition, an analyst hints that Apple may offer live streaming television content.

DigiTimes reported yesterday that the 32- and 37-inch Apple television could be ready for launch as early as the middle of next year. Today, their sources have given more information as to who the manufacturing partners will be, as well as mentioning that Foxconn will probably be the one to complete assembly.

Following sources’ claims that Samsung Electronics and Sharp will manufacture chips and displays, respectively, for the so-called Apple “iTV,” others have suggested that Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), Advanced Semiconductor Engineering (ASE) and Siliconware Precision Industries (SPIL) have the potential to win orders for Apple’s smart TV.

Foxconn Electronics (Hon Hai Precision Industry) likely will obtain assembly orders for the Apple smart TV, according to industry sources.

Foxconn is the company that currently assembles iOS devices for Apple. In addition, sources told DigiTimes that Apple will probably finalize hardware standards by the end of Q2 next year and place orders directly with its manufacturing partners. This follows their standard practice with iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad.

To add to the rumor mill, AppleInsider quotes Sterne Agee analyst Shaw Wu. He predicts that for Apple to make its TV worthwhile, it’ll have to revolutionize the way TV programming is delivered.

“Customized programming is said to be one of Apple’s most desired features for its rumored television set.”

“In Apple’s vision, customers would choose whichever channels or shows they want for a monthly subscription fee.”

“Today, iTunes has a rich library of movies and TV shows but it is mostly for downloads and only movies are available for rentals (TV shows once were but were terminated in August 2011),” he wrote. “What’s missing is live broadcast television.”

Wu suggested that Apple could integrate with content systems that consumers already have in place, like satellite and cable service providers. However, they could revolutionize things by offering live content delivered via the internet or through iTunes.

Considering that Apple’s TV set’s prices are predicted to be much higher than comparable sets, they might need that tactic to draw consumer attention. What do you think? Will Apple revolutionize content delivery? Do they need to?

[via DigiTimes, AppleInsider]