Microsoft caught lying about Windows 8 tablet size in iPad vs. Windows comparison

Hot on the heels of releasing the Windows 8 tablet ads which took a dig at Apple’s iPad, Microsoft has launched a new webpage that compares the ASUS VivoTab Smart Windows 8 tablet with the full-sized iPad.

Similar to the ad, the chart compares the Windows 8 tablet’s thinness, battery life, weight, display size, microHDMI and microSD ports, printing, ability to run Microsoft Office suite of products and more. Microsoft has also included a diagram of the 9.7-inch iPad next to the ASUS VivoTab Smart Windows 8 tablet that looks visibly larger.

ipadvsvivo

However, Elliot Temple of Curi.us says that Microsoft is being dishonest in the advertising as the image is not up to scale. He explains on his blog:

MS-ad

Microsoft has drawn a 10.1 inch tablet 36% larger than a 9.7 inch tablet (140×78 pixels vs 102×79). This is so far off you can visually see it’s wrong.

The iPad has a screen area of 45.16 square inches, which I double checked with a calculator.

The ASUS VivoTab Smart has a screen area of 43.56 square inches. That’s right, the ASUS screen is smaller than the iPad’s.

The iPad screen is 7.76 by 5.82 inches. The ASUS screen is 8.8 by 4.95 inches. ASUS is larger in one direction but smaller in the other direction, and has 3.55% less area than the iPad, not 36% more as Microsoft depicts.

Microsoft had initially also stated that the Windows 8 tablet has a bigger touchscreen than the iPad, but it seems to have removed it.

The ASUS VivoTab Smart is lighter than the iPad, has a bigger touchscreen and more ports, works with more printers, lets you see two apps at once, and runs Microsoft Office and other desktop programs. 

It now just says:

The ASUS VivoTab Smart is lighter than the iPad, has more ports, works with more printers, lets you see two apps at once, and runs Microsoft Office and other desktop programs.

However, it is yet to fix the image, which shows that the Windows 8 tablet is visibly bigger than the iPad, which is not the case. Temple goes on to write:

How can the screen with a larger diagonal measurement be smaller? Because it’s a different shape. Long and thin gets you a bigger diagonal but a smaller screen, for the same diagonal inches. 

It is quite embarrassing for a company like Microsoft to get caught lying about something like this.

What do you think? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

HT: Daring Fireball