Toyota backtracks on plans to support CarPlay

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When Apple announced its CarPlay platform last March, the company told us that Toyota would be one of a number of car manufacturers to adopt its new platform. But according to one Toyota manager, the company currently has no plans to support CarPlay in the U.S.

“We may all eventually wind up there, but right now we prefer to use our in-house proprietary platforms for those kinds of functions,” said John Hanson, the national manager of Toyota’s advanced technology communications, when asked about in-car entertainment and navigation during an interview with The New York Times.

As the third best-selling auto brand in the U.S., the news will no doubt be a blow to Apple and its millions of customers based in America. But it’s unclear whether Toyota will be supporting the CarPlay platform in other markets, either.

Last March, Toyota’s U.K. arm published a blog post in which it promised the first CarPlay-equipped vehicles for 2015, but the company quickly backtracked on that claim.

An update to its original article reads, “This is incorrect and we are happy to put the matter straight. No announcements have been made about if and when Apple CarPlay will arrive in Toyota cars.”

It’s not totally clear whether Toyota will be supporting CarPlay at all, then, but the fact that it was mentioned in Apple’s original CarPlay announcement suggests a deal was in place at some point. We’ll have to wait and see whether that’s still the case.

The NYT piece, which mostly focuses on CarPlay rival Android Auto — which Toyota also has no plans to support — highlights the struggle Apple, Google, and others are having in convincing manufacturers to adopt their in-car systems.

Some car makers, such as Hyundai, have vowed to support both in an effort to appeal to as many customers as possible. It’s thought manufactures may be worried that supporting CarPlay could alienate Android users, and vice-versa.

With that being the case, CarPlay and Android Auto may be more successful on aftermarket in-car systems that we can install into our vehicles ourselves. These also mean you don’t need to buy a brand new car to take advantage of either platform.

[via MacRumors]