Lenovo Previews World’s First Foldable PC; Launching in 2020

Lenovo Foldable PC

Foldable smartphones might have had a rocky start but that is not stopping Lenovo from previewing the world’s first foldable PC. Yep, a foldable PC. There’s no name here or a price tag or even a shipping date. I guess Lenovo just wanted to be the first company in the world to demo a foldable PC.


The company previewed the foldable PC at its Accelerate 2019 event in Orlando. The laptop does carry the Thinkpad branding but that’s about it. Other details about its specs, price, etc. are not available as of now.

Lenovo revealed that it has been working on foldable PCs for years with Intel, Microsoft, and LG. The foldable display is being supplied by LG — it is a 13.3-inch 2K OLED display with 4:3 aspect ratio. It features a touchscreen and will support pen input. Lenovo is targeting to launch the foldable PC with the same capabilities as its X1 line.

“It’s going to be running a future Intel-based platform that we’re not going to disclose at this time,” Tom Butler, Lenovo’s ThinkPad marketing director said. “Think about a screen that can fold, a screen that can fold, and can have multiple windows and experiences. We’re working with Microsoft to optimize for that type of experience.”

When folded, the device will be about half as thick and about the size of a hardcover book. The hinge system on a foldable device is really important and Lenovo says it has worked a lot on it. And yes, the company has addressed all issues with the hinge and screen durability.

Our Take

Lenovo intends to launch this foldable PC in 2020. Until then, it is going to work on further refining this prototype and figure out ways on how it would be useful in real-life. After all, laptops are also folding PCs, just that they are not entirely made of a foldable display. And what’s stopping one from calling this foldable PC a folding tablet? After all, this is just one giant foldable display with PC parts slapped to it.

What are your thoughts on Lenovo’s foldable PC prototype? Do you think it would be useful in real-life? Or is it just a gimmick?

[Via VentureBeat]