Telegram Files EU Antitrust Complaint Against Apple

Apple has now been subjected to another anti-trust complaint in the EU, this time from Telegram. In their complaint, the developers of Telegram claim that Apple is limiting competition by not allowing users to download apps from outside of the App Store.

Apple is already the subject of two EU investigations — one for App Store and another for Apple Pay. Many other major app developers including Spotify have previously complained about Apple to the EU as well.

Apple has long argued that the 30 percent commission it charges for App Store transactions helps it to keep the App Store running. However, in a public blog post, Telegram’s founder Pavel Durov claims while Apple receives billions of dollars from third-parties every month for hosting apps on the App Store, their expenses are in tens of millions, not billions.

In fact, running an app store costs only a fraction of what Apple takes from app developers. Every quarter, Apple receives billions of dollars from third-party apps. Meanwhile, the expenses required to host and review these apps are in the tens of millions, not billions of dollars. We know that because we at Telegram host and review more public content than the App Store ever will. Actually, any company running a massive video platform will need both more servers and more moderators than a company running an app store.

In the blog post, Durov busts other myths related to Apple and the App Store and why the company charging 30 percent commission is completely wrong. He even argues that Apple is no longer innovating and has been trying to “catch up with Android phones in features and hardware.”

Apple has come under intense criticism in recent times from app developers for the 30 percent fee that it charges app developers for App Store transactions. It was just yesterday that Apple’s CEO Tim Cook defended the company’s App Store policies in front of U.S. anti-trust regulators saying it treats all developers equally despite clearly creating an exception for Amazon.

We Want to Hear From You

Do you think Apple is right in charging 30 percent commission for App Store sales from developers? Or do you think the company should reduce its fees?