iPhone 12 Was the World’s Best-Selling 5G Smartphone in October 2020

iOS 14.3 on iPhone 12

A new report from Counterpoint Research claims that the iPhone 12 series became the world’s best-selling 5G smartphone within a couple of weeks of its release in October. This was followed by the iPhone 12 Pro which was the second-best 5G smartphone sold in October.

Combined, the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro captured nearly one-fourth of the total 5G smartphone shipments in October 2020. What’s even more impressive is that the iPhone 12 managed to enter the top 10 best-selling smartphones list at the seventh position for the January-October 2020 period despite being on sale for just two weeks.

Samsung, which was the previous market leader for 5G smartphones, came in third with the Galaxy Note20 Ultra. Surprisingly, despite all the ban and other issues surrounding its smartphone business, three Huawei smartphones made it among the top 10 list of the best-selling 5G smartphones.

As per Counterpoint, the massive success of the iPhone 12 can be attributed to the massive pent-up demand for 5G among existing iPhone users. The strong marketing from carriers and various promotions from them in the United States also helped, with carrier sales accounting for over one-third of iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro sales in October. The initial demand for the iPhone 12 series was also high in China and Japan. The wide availability of the devices in over 140 countries also helped with the iPhone 12 series doing so well after launch.

For Q4, demand for the iPhone 12 series is expected to be strong. The delayed launch of the iPhone 12 series also means that the demand for the devices will be higher than usual in early 2021.

Our Take

Analysts had widely expected that the launch of 5G iPhones would lead to a supercycle of existing iPhone users upgrading to them. What’s impressive is that the iPhone 12 series is doing well despite the bleak economic conditions worldwide. The strong demand for the iPhone 12 series has even taken Apple by surprise, with the company bumping production to meet demand.

[Via Counterpoint Research]