iPhone 13’s A15 Chip Production Could Start in May, 4nm Chips Coming Next Year

iPhone 13 lineup render

A new report from Digitimes claims that the production of the A15 Bionic chip for the iPhone 13 lineup will reportedly start in May. The report also details Apple’s plan of introducing a 4nm chip with the 2022 iPhone.

According to a new report from Digitimes, Apple is targeting May for the production of the A15 Bionic chips. Apple will hand over the contract to its long-term chip manufacturer, TSMC, for the A15 chips. The chip is expected to retain the same 5nm nanometer fabrication size as the last year’s A14 Bionic, which was used in the widely popular iPad Air and iPhone 12 lineup.

The report also highlights that even though the fabrication size is expected to be the same, Apple has achieved an ‘enhanced’ manufacturing process for this year’s iPhone processor. Even though Apple is on track to launch the iPhone 13 lineup in September, there has been a certain delay in the production of chips.

Last year, even after TSMC and Apple were hit due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the A14 Bionic chip production started in April. This year, the reports claim that the production could be delayed to May. Though this might be due to the 5nm manufacturing process already in place, and the ‘enhanced’ manufacturing process making the chip production faster.

Both the A14 Bionic and Apple M1 chips are based on 5nm and have impressed the masses with their performance. And it seems like Apple is keen to keep the lead with the company ordering TSMC to start manufacturing 4nm chips in the fall of 2021. Digitimes says the 4nm chips will first debut on the next-generation Apple Silicon MacBooks, instead of 2022 iPhones.

With Apple preparing to start production of 4nm chips in late 2021, we can expect the first series of Apple MacBooks with the 4nm processor to hit shelves in the spring of 2022.

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[Via Digitimes]