Apple Will Alert Users of Unknown AirTag in Frequently Visited Places

Earlier this month, Apple finally launched the AirTag item tracker. AirTag rivals Tile and is priced well at $29. Weeks after launch, users are raising privacy concerns with regards to Apple’s item tracker. A majority of people are concerned about being tracked by others using an AirTag.

Imagine what if your ex or a person with ill intentions is tracking your movement. All they need to do is place an AirTag in your bag or stick it to your car. Well, Apple has already thought of the problem, and the solution is baked into AirTag.

In an interview with Fast Company, Apple said that Find My would alert users if someone has placed an AirTag. Furthermore, they will also get alerts in frequently visited places like gyms, offices, or any other location. AirTag will alert the users about unknown trackers only after a certain length of time to avoid false alarms. Apple has not mentioned the time interval, though.

Apple has built some protections into this system. If you are an ‌iPhone‌ user, for instance, and someone has placed an AirTag on your person, your phone will eventually alert you that an AirTag that isn’t yours has been found “moving with you.” Apple didn’t clarify how quickly or often this alert will arrive, but it did share that it will occur when you arrive at your home (the address stored in your Apple “Me” card) or at certain other locations that your phone has learned you frequent over time. Apple declined to disclose further specifics, citing the interest of public safety.

Apple has already mentioned that AirTag is not meant for tracking kids or pets. In other words, it is strictly meant for tracking items like luggage, wallet, and other knick-knacks. NNDEV a non profit that works towards ending violence against woman are concerned that AirTag could end up as surveillance tool.

An abuser can “slip into someone’s bag or jacket pocket” to track them. The group asks whether AirTag protection features work on Android devices as well. What are your thoughts on AirTag privacy? Let us know in the comments below.

[via Fast Company]